58th Boys' Brigade Beating Retreat 2015

Posted on: Monday, May 11, 2015

Boys' Brigade joined by Brigade President for Beating Retreat

150 young people from The Boys’ Brigade (BB) were joined by The Lord Griffiths of Burry Port, for the annual Beating Retreat ceremony at Edinburgh Castle on Saturday 9th May 2015.

The event, the 58th consecutive holding of the ceremony, featured the Massed Pipes & Drums, 1st Tulliallan BB Band, Central Band of The Boys’ Brigade and 3rd Johnstone Brigades Band; and saw each band march across the drawbridge and performs a short routine on the Castle Esplanade to the delight of the gathered crowd of spectators and dignitaries.

 

Chief Guest was The Lord Griffiths of Burry Port, Brigade President. He said:

“It was wonderfully refreshing for a Welshman based in London (and a “Westminster man” to boot) to be present at this event.

“The enthusiasm, energy, discipline and commitment of all involved were so captivating. This isn’t what’s supposed to be happening with young people these days.

“It was brilliant. I’ve once attended the famous Tattoo at the Castle – I found this just as moving. Well done the Boys’ Brigade. I just wish I were young again to be part of it all myself.”

 

Cameron Stein, 1st Kirkliston, said:

“What an amazing experience it was playing at Edinburgh Castle. It was so different from where we are used to playing.  The memory of playing in the band in such a stunning location will last a lifetime.”

 

Ian Montgomery, The Boys’ Brigade Edinburgh, Leith & District Battalion President, said:

“It was a privilege for us to welcome Lord Griffiths to our flagship event.

“It is always fantastic that our BB musicians from across Scotland have the opportunity to play in the heart of Edinburgh.  These bands have been rehearsing for many months in preparation for the event and their professionalism and talent shone through.”

 

Beating Retreat is a military ceremony dating back to the 16th century when drums were used as signals in the battlefields.

Beating the Retreat was the cue for troops to retreat from battle as light faded.

 

 

All event photographs can be view here.